• Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer

    2 days ago - By The Huffington Post

    When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot's The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks , and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey.
    Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took...
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  • The Disturbing History of African-Americans and Medical Research Goes Beyond Henrietta Lacks

    The Disturbing History of African-Americans and Medical Research Goes Beyond Henrietta Lacks

    2 days ago - By Time

    Ask a given person what they know about the history of the use of African-Americans as unwilling research subjects and they are likely to mention one infamous incident: Tuskegee. “Such a failure seems almost beyond belief, or human compassion,” TIME wrote when the study made headlines in 1972, as the world learned that for four decades the U.S. Public Health Service had been conducting an experiment in which proven remedies were kept from syphilis patients in Alabama, all of whom were black men. But there's a lot more to that history.
    “Tuskegee shouldn't be the first thing people think...
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